The Peak of the Flood

Sunny! Warm! Gotta love it! The birds do, I can hear them through the open window. An open window!

It has been an uneventful day, thank goodness.

The flood waters continue to rise, and still have not peaked, according to the local news. I thought they had peaked, but Attila assures me that they have risen since yesterday. Our neighbour, down the road, had their front steps have float away. The rising water should peak early next week. The lakes are spotted with floating deck chairs, trees, boats, docks, and all kinds of other flotsam and jetsam. Boating on the lakes is hazardous. Boat houses are up to their necks in it. Many of the boathouses are really luxury homes on the water, used as “bunkies”, for guests of the big houses/cottages. Serious damage is being done

I think Attila and I will still by high and dry when the flood peaks. There are some advantages to owning a home that is not on the waterfront.

This evening I spent some time with Attila loading wood into the wheelbarrow, for transport to the woodshed. I loaded the wheelbarrow seven times with 100 lbs. of wood each time. I am not accustomed to such heavy repetitive work, so I left off before feeling worn out. To prevent swelling in my back I took an Ibuprofen and sat for a while with my feet up, with a good book.

I slept poorly last night; perhaps tonight I will sleep soundly.

Ontario Barns April 21, 2013 [Taken at 90 km an hour, through a closed car window.]
Web 004 green roof

Worldly Distractions

Weather

10C
Condition: Sunny
Pressure: 103.1 kPa
Visibility: 16 km
Temperature: 9.8°C
Dewpoint: -5.3°C
Humidity: 34%
Wind: W 9 km/

Quote

“Oh sleep! It is a gentle thing,
Beloved from pole to pole.”
Samuel Taylor Coleridge
1772 – 1834

Tagged , . Bookmark the permalink.

7 Responses to The Peak of the Flood

  1. Bex says:

    “…There are some advantages to owning a home that is not on the waterfront.”

    You said a mouthful there. I remember back when we were house-hunting just after we were married, and all the houses I loved were low-lying but I didn’t realize the hazards of such a situation. Paul wisely kept refusing to entertaining buying one of those lovely places that I so wanted and, instead, finally said “yes” to our current home, on the hill. Inland from the sea, about a mile, and up on a hill of rock, we seem to be impervious to the wild weather that Nature throws at us here.

  2. Maggie says:

    Bex, another example of two heads being better than one, united we stand sort of thing. Good for Paul for sticking to his guns.

    The waterfront property here is so expensive that we could not even pay the taxes due, let alone afford the million dollar properties to begin with. For us, there was never any question about living on the water, not in this area anyway.

  3. ava south says:

    I like to be dnear the water too, but know the danger and the expense. Here it’s the Gulf of Mexico and during hurricane season, many homes flood or carried away. Still the propel with money build very expensive “sand castles” right on the beach.

  4. ava south says:

    Please excuse my typos. My fingers have a mind of their own. lol

  5. Maggie says:

    Ava, those fingers sound frustrating, but so very glad you keep them going on the keyboard!

    I love your reference to “sand castles” right on the beach, so very, very apt.

  6. Sarah says:

    I’m glad you’re high and (relatively) dry, but I know how unnerving it can be with the flood waters rising, even so. It’s been an unsettling/sad time for you–no wonder you slept poorly! And, yes, my guess would be that you’ll sleep soundly tonight, what with all that’s happened. Work is something of an anodyne.

    We here in southern California are subject to frequent earthquakes. So much so that a “4” doesn’t even make the news. Ho hum. But for all of us, in the quiet of the night, there is the worry about “The Big One” when the San Andreas Fault finally gives way. Most people with any sense have an earthquake survival kit with water, food, tools, hand cranked radio. Plus mine has instant coffee, of course. Upstairs I have a ladder that can go out of a window to get down to ground level if the stairs are damaged.

    I live inland; a Big One just might make my house beach front property! That’s the joke around here–kind of dark, but if we can’t joke about it, we can’t deal with it.

    Sleep tight.

  7. Maggie says:

    Earthquakes are so sudden. At least with slow rising flood waters we can walk away from any potential dangers; moving water is another thing altogether. Instant coffee in a survival kit! Brilliant!

    I know what you mean about dark humour, it does contain/deflect fear. I have a few sudden death jokes I tell, when I need to discuss anaphylaxis in a social setting.